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Program




Heads of Space Agencies Summit
on
Climate Change and Disaster Management
Space Systems for the Benefit of Earth and Humankind
September 18, 2015
Mexico City, Mexico

program

Program is available in pdf print version


09:30 – 10:30        Registration

Thursday 18 September 2015    10:30 - 11:15     Room: Fiestas


Opening ceremony of the Heads of Space Agencies Summit

Session  Chair : Dr. Jean-Michel Contant, Secretary General International Academy of Astronautics
Rapporteur: Miss Sandra Cabrera


Dr. Francisco Mendietta, video on Climate Change and Disaster Management from Mexico

Dr. Madhavan Nair, President, International Academy of Astronautics

Dr. Francisco Mendieta-Jimenez, Director General, Mexican Space Agency, Space Agency Host

Dr. James H. Crocker, Vice President & General Manager, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company

Dr. Simonetta Di Pippo, Director UNOOSA

Dr. Johann-Dietrich Woerner, Director General ESA

Dr. Jean-Yves Le Gall, President CNES, France, IAA COP21 Coordinator

Mtro. Gerardo Ruíz Esparza, Ministry of Communications and Transportation



10h30-10:45    Coffee-Break
Video Movies from Russia, France and Mexico



Thursday 18 September 2015    10h45-12-45     Room: Fiestas
                                                                                             Rapporteur: Miss Sandra Cabrera

Roundtable on Climate Change

The Global Climate-Carbon Observing System: Achieving a dense, robust and sustained international climate-carbon observing system.
Changes in atmospheric radiative forcing arising from greenhouse gas emissions are the most important driver of climate change. Primarily because of anthropogenic activities, the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, principally carbon dioxide and methane have increased substantially over the last century. Importantly, CO2 concentrations would be even higher if it were not for large compensating uptake by the terrestrial biosphere and oceans, offsetting roughly 50% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions to date. Increasing CO2 concentrations and surface temperature have direct carbon cycle feedback effects on the biospheric and oceanic uptake of CO2; however, the magnitude and range of these feedbacks remain uncertain.
There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has recognized understanding the climate-carbon system, with its complex array of feedbacks, as an important goal. Emerging measurement systems, including the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), and other new sources of data offer a vision for the future. While these pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage needed to answer the key climate-carbon feedback questions, nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources, they do clearly demonstrate that a well-planned future international system integrating space-based and in situ observations and measurements could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address the climate-carbon system.




12:45-14:00    Lunch Restaurant Bugambilias



Thursday 18 September 2015    14h00-16-00     Room: Fiestas
                                                                                                             Rapporteur: Miss Sandra Cabrera
 
Roundtable on Disaster Management

Space and Preventing and Treatment of Natural Risks:

Earth observations and Space‐based technologies are already playing a crucial role in contributing to the generation of relevant information to support informed decision‐making regarding risk and vulnerability reduction and to address the underlying factors of disaster risk. International cooperation is needed more to access to and the sharing and use of non-sensitive data and information, as appropriate, communications and geospatial and space-based technologies and related services; maintain and strengthen in situ and remotely- sensed Earth observations.

Further international coordination on satellites orbit assignment is required in order to receive the observation data from satellites as immediately as possible after the disaster. R&D should be accelerated to observe the earth surface anytime and to get information for prediction. Regional mechanisms have to be established in African and South America regions for disaster management. Developed countries should assist the nations without space resources for capacity building.




16h00-16:15    Coffee-Break


Thursday 18 September 2015    16h15-16-45     Room: Fiestas

Session  Chair : Dr. Jean-Michel Contant, Secretary General International Academy of Astronautics
Rapporteur: Miss Sandra Cabrera

Heads of Space Agencies Summit Conclusions


Heads of Space Agencies Summit Declaration by
Dr. Jean-Yves Le Gall, President CNES, France, IAA COP21 Coordinator

Dr. Francisco Mendieta-Jimenez, Director General, Mexican Space Agency

Dr. Madhavan Nair, President, International Academy of Astronautics




16:45 End


Room: Fiestas
17h00-17:45    Press Conference
        Madhavan Nair, Francisco Mendieta-Jimenez, Jean-Yves Le Gall
and Jean-Michel Contant

Room: Duque
17h00-18:00    Meeting of Heads of Space Agencies with Mexican students
        All
Room: Fiestas
18h30-19:30    Cocktail






 

International Academy of Astronautics